It’s not something a lot of libraries are proud (hence, why I don’t think it’s being shared, even w/in the library community), but I’ve found that many of the libraries have been hit by web accessibility lawsuits;

I’m a mediocre web developer so I knew about accessibility in basic principles (use “alt text”, use headings, don’t use flash, etc) so when our website was served with an accessibility lawsuit, I quickly learned a bit about how to make a site accessible;

I’ve found quickly learning about accessibility that as a web developer found really frustrating:

There were a couple key lessons that I’ve learned as I’ve made for but they are not articulated loud enough:

Accessibility is subjective.

A web page that’s considered accessible for one person may not be considered to be accessible for another person.

I’ve had this document written and if I can point anyone to any accessibility related document, I’d have them read this first.

Accessibility is not a certification; You can’t make your site “accessible”. Your site can be considered accessible for some users. https://ischool.syr.edu/infospace/2018/03/02/kate-deibel-inclusion-accessibility-librarian-syracuse-university/

How do you test a site to be accessible”? There’s no foolproof clear list. If you are following the WCAG 2.0 list, https://www.w3.org/WAI/test-evaluate/conformance/wcag-em/

this is not a bad list, http://www.karlgroves.com/2013/09/05/the-6-simplest-web-accessibility-tests-anyone-can-do/ (ON 2018-08-05 this didn’t work but I swear it did before)

and there’s the automated checkers as well which ; but if you do those 6 things, is your site accessible? How do I know my site is accessible? You can’t be or even near certain - which is frustrating - Heck, I still don’t know if it’s frustrating.

You can’t even ask

I’ve only personally interviewed a handful ; but tutorials assume that leave me with a taste that it’s assumed most people who will rely on the keyboard are extremely adept at using keyboard shortcuts.

SIDENOTE: There’s a myth that accessibility it isn’t expensive.

I call frankly bullshit on this.

Generating captions for audio and video material that don’t already have them (many historical documents) - this is extremely prevalent for historical documents. It IS NOT cheap (if you think it is - please give me a reference of a place to have );

Pages that are introductory (cite all of the examples here) are very cursory, just remember and think about accessibility! rhetoric which seems pervasive in the

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